Tim Hortons Restaurant & Jumbo Burger’s agreement for Bakers dozen site secures revit of block

jumbo burger facing north

This blog would like to contend that the principals of Jumbo Burgers which also own the Tim Hortons site née Bakers Dozen site served (pun intended) the community well in bringing Tim Hortons to the site. They are not developers but restaurant owners who have long served the Junction community. Expecting them to develop the site into a use or building that benefits its unique pie shape is unreasonable. Building out the site into a structure that fully heeded the shape of the lot and its definitive place of Dundas St W. west would have been so wonderful. But could it / or can it happen at all in Toronto.

What would have been great…

1) A community art house with multiple floors with public and private galleries – hey maybe The Telephone gallery could have moved there for a bigger space. This is not Denmark, so it’s not going to happen, the hole of Toronto does not have a community art house.

2) A flatiron shaped condo – well that would have just provided some with an exclusive and interesting address. Abet with design fit-in issues at the point where the building sat at the east end.

3) another restaurant? – one that would attract as much traffic as a Tim Hortons – increased activity is what the community needs in this area.

4) buy it and extend the park… this did happen in 1972 when the community forced the city to buy the SHUR gain plant on Vine Ave and double the size of the park, (oh and the city claimed then there was no money to buy the plant, but under strong community pressure and a skill member of council for the area it happened. Could that happen today?

but now…

The Bakers Dozen signs are down from the building and the interior fitting removal are well under way. The blog author does feel this new Tim Hortons Restaurant will greatly contribute to revitalize the western Junction Strip.

Enterprising people have opened great businesses – such as the Telephone Gallery, the salons, Simardone Design, the Crosstown Car-wash, all have pushed forward the breathing of new life into the two block stretch. Long investing Lucky Star Cleaners & Launderers – certainly one of the best run cleaners in the entire city – Lotus Inn Chinese Cuisine and Victoria & Co have stayed the test of time and should hopefully greatly benefit.

Traffic patterns will change and there will be more traffic on the surrounding residential streets. The increase in traffic has occurred thought-out the Junction and all of the Greater Junction Area as the resurgence has occurred over the past 15 years. Near the new Tim Hortons lot to the east, Mc Murray Ave, Quebec Ave, Pacific Ave, Medland Ave, and every other street has more traffic and parking. During the prime supper hour parking on these side streets simply cannot be found, as people park on the streets while attending the restaurants. It all part of a better neighborhood of retail amenities, if not for ease of residential parking, when one returns from work.

It’s good thing.

 

6 Comments

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  1. Tristen Brown says:

    1) would have been awesome, 3) as a close second.

  2. A.R. says:

    “Expecting them to develop the site into a use or building that befits its unique pie shape is unreasonable. Building out the site into a structure that fully heeded the shape of the lot and its definitive place of Dundas St W. west would have been so wonderful. But could it / or can it happen at all in Toronto.”

    How is that unreasonable? Anyone could have done that. This area has become desirable. Tim Horton’s will probably depend on drivers. The Dundas strip depends on people walking along it. The car wash on Dundas creates a worthless dead zone for pedestrians and has not contributed to revitalizing the strip, which still is the most dead part of the Dundas strip in the Junction west of Dupont.

    Traffic is not a good thing: it means pollution, noise and streets that are less safe for people. If more people are coming to the neighbourhood, then great. But we have to look at getting them here without cars to minimize the pollution, noise and dangers created by excess traffic. Light rail and a subway station as part of the downtown relief line should be investigated now to avoid the kind of traffic that will degrade our quality of life in the coming decades.

    • junctioneer says: (Author)

      Sorry the blog was unclear in using the word traffic, by which it was meant people activity.

      Have corrected it.

      I agree with your take in traffic, but cannot with the statement “anyone could” develop the site. The shape if the lot its small size, its location so close to houses on the south make it a difficult site to develop. No doubt a inventive and code expert developer – with a constitution to accept the time it would take to zoning and approval issues say Howard Cohen of Context.

  3. Brian says:

    I know there are call for more park space, but we have a lot here in the Junction. I would like to see the empty lot adjacent to Vine Ave. Park (where Topper used to park) turned into a Green P parking lot. It would ease the parking on the side streets, especially in an area where you have three dead ends (Clen., Que., McM.) and residents can hardly ever find a place to park, as you said, during the 5-6:30 supper hour. It is great for the community that so many people are coming out for the retail and eats, but residents pay for parking on these side streets. Visitors do not. It hardly seems fair to have to lug your groceries or your kids a few blocks home after finding a parking spot down the road. As I understand it, the city offers permits to cars where there is space available on the street. They keep track of the number of cars with permits and the number of spaces available. They don’t take into account visitors.
    So, a large Green P would be wonderful on Vine… especially now that the Pacific Green P is virtually always filled up around the dinner hour now.
    Just my two cents.

  4. Stan says:

    I would agree with A.R.’s comments above.

    There are plenty of coffee shops nearby and a Timmy’s a km down Dundas across from the Lcbo. There is going to be all kinds of congestion with people hopping out of their cars to get coffee. There will also be the standard amount of discarded cups along the road and by the park.
    I fail to see how a Tim Hortons here provides spill over business. Think about this from the perspective of a customer. You don’t go to get a coffee at Timmies and then suddenly decide to pick up Chinese food or visit the Maltese bakery. This Timmies will attract the vehicle traffic on Dundas or people who live in the area. They are not destination points for people outside of the area rather a convenient stop for people on the go.
    One idea would have been that fruit and veggie market mentioned on this blog that also serves fresh healthy juices. This seems more natural with a park behind it.
    One thing we know is that Timmies’ never close. This is a long term impact to the area.

    • junctioneer says: (Author)

      Yes, How could I have forgot that! – A permanent place for a farmers market or a fruit and veg retailer.

      as the comment put it better that the blog.

      One idea would have been that fruit and veggie market mentioned on this blog that also serves fresh healthy juices. This seems more natural with a park behind it.

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